sluggish thyroid

Posts Tagged ‘Film Capital’

23
Feb

Many Hedge Funds, including New York’s Elliott Associates, are seeing premium returns from investing in film and media. While historically, film financing has been met with skepticism from portfolio managers, private equity groups, high net worth investors, family offices, and pension funds, the returns that Elliott Associates is generating as well as Honeywell Pensions, which reportedly parked more than $600 million to finance a slate of Warner Brothers’ films is opening the door to a Chicago company’s structure for being the next in a wave of attracting both institutional and retail capital. "As a non correlated asset class, films and film finance has outperformed every non correlated asset class in the world", states Yuri Rutman, head of media finance and consulting firm Noci Pictures ( www.noci.com ). "If you look at the more than $6 billion dollars poured into motion picture finance deals in the last 3 years, the IRR across the spectrum for both studios and independents are resilient to global economic declines in other industries." The Company is looking to bring on board an experienced hedge fund, private equity, or alternative investment capital raiser to identify U.S. and international private equity partners in both institutional and retail sectors in closing a $300 million dollar structured media & entertainment fund that would not only finance 20-30 films, but have the infrastructure in place for U.S. Theatrical Distribution either with one of a few major film studios the company is ...

23
Feb

FBT Film & Entertainment

  FBT Film & Entertainment is owned by FBT Advisors, Inc., an affiliate of First Bank and Trust and a subsidiary of First Trust Corporation since 2001.  As a bank affiliate it offers a complete choice of banking relationship products.  In addition it offers a range of broker services including investments, insurance, business advisory, and venture capital.   The unique ability to integrate these services for its film industry clients gives it an unmatched edge over any competitor. FBT Film started with the goal of increasing local community involvement with the film industry and the development of our industryhas been nothing short of remarkable.  They are actively working to further expand the local film industry while assisting the state of Louisiana in recruiting new film projects.   It has also been instrumental in cultivating partnerships between out of state media production companies and local firms to make the best use of available resources.  They take special pride in seeing Louisiana businesses grow and prosper as a result. It works with the Louisiana Film Commissioner's office, statewide local municipalities, film liaisons and the UNO Foundation's Nims Studio to fully utilize the production capacity and studio facilities. Its Los Angeles staff has extensive experience in the entertainment industry and fully understands the process of organizing, financing, and working within the Louisiana production process. FBT Film also proudly supports A Child's Wish of Louisiana, a local organization which grants wishes to children with life-threatening illnesses. Source-  http://www.fbtfilm.com

23
Feb

Hedge Funds and Film Finance

As a new financiers to the movie industry, Hedge Funds are  attracted by the potential returns on diverse portfolios of movies especially from DVD sales. Given, Hollywood has a bad reputation for parting star-struck investors from their cash hedge fund managers will need to stay sharp and structure their investments carefully. Helen Avery reports. Film finance was often a high-risk/high-return investment proposition with a reputation for burning investors. Now, though, hedge fund managers are finding ways to mitigate risk and penetrate opaque film industry accounting practices Frank Yablans is the Warren Buffett of Hollywood. Former president of Paramount Pictures and former chairman of MGM, the 71-year-old has more than 300 films, including blockbusters such as The Godfather, Serpico, Paper Moon and Murder on the Orient Express. Back in the early 1970s when Paramount made the original version of The Longest Yard, Yablans remembers, third-party financing came from tax-shelter deals. Now Yablans is running his own film production and distribution company, Promenade Pictures. With investment advisory firm Bluebay Capital, Promenade is seeking finance from the most recent investor base to hit Tinseltown – hedge funds.This sophisticated investor base has invested an estimated $4 billion into Hollywood in the past three years in investment vehicles that, like Yablans’s operation, and are attempting to create a high-returning asset class with speculative investment in the film industry. In the past it has been a commonplace expectation that if you put money into Hollywood, you ...

23
Feb

Financing Opportunity for Film Makers.

  If you want to benefit from the opportunity of taking your story idea to the big screen. Singapore's Media Development Authority (MDA) has opened its third call-for-proposals under its International Film Fund (IFF) and is looking to co-invest in globally marketable films involving at least one Singapore partner. What's more, completed films could premiere globally at ScreenSingapore, the week-long international cinema event comprising a trade show, conferences, master classes, a film awards section as well as red carpet gala premieres. ScreenSingapore, hosted by MDA and organised by Singapore Airshow & Events Pte Ltd (SAe), is a platform for Asian content to be marketed to the world and for international films to be released in Asia. Mr Kenneth Tan, Director of Film, Animation and Publishing, MDA, said: "The IFF complements our co-production strategy aimed at growing Singapore-made content targeting global audiences. It facilitates collaboration among international creative talents, and the participation of Singapore's production and post-production facilities in international film productions. "Singapore currently has four official film co-production partner countries - namely Australia, Canada, China and New Zealand. We welcome filmmakers to work with us and our network of official co-production partnering countries through the IFF to realise their aspirations, and tell their stories to movie-goers around the world." Projects selected under the current round of IFF will be announced at the inaugural edition of ScreenSingapore from 5 to 12 June 2011. About the International Film Fund (IFF) The IFF was launched in 2009 to encourage ...

22
Feb

The Institute for International Film Financing ("IIFF") is an innovative, independent social-impact organization dedicated to bridging the gap between the worlds of filmmaking and finance. IIFF's one-of-a-kind mission is to prudently expand the scope and appeal of film financing in an economically sustainable manner, for the benefit of all stakeholders including the public at large. Established in 2003 by former investment banker Thomas Trenker, IIFF is incorporated in California as a not-for-profit, public-benefit corporation headquartered in San Francisco. IIFF remedies stifling inefficiencies in film financing and cultivates success in independent film by instituting a trusted platform for research, education, networking and collaboration at the nexus of film and finance. IIFF represents the interests —and addresses the challenges— of film entrepreneurs and investors alike, and serves the public benefit by reinvigorating independent film. Democratizing Film Financing Obtaining proper financing is the single most pervasive, yet most persistently overlooked, barrier to success in independent film. Even seasoned financiers and producers are often at a loss when it comes to effectively and successfully financing film. IIFF aims to create economic sustainability in film financing by enabling both filmmakers and financiers to consistently benefit from their interactions. IIFF brings film financing knowledge, skills and opportunities to a broad and diverse audience. This opens new financing channels for filmmakers, exposes investors to an expanded menu of choices, invigorates local filmmaking communities and grows regional economies in which they are embedded. The Best of Two Worlds IIFF fuses the best ...

22
Feb

How to Fund Your Film

How to Fund Your Film, the Film Finance Handbook, is the definitive source book for anyone looking to fund a film project - be it script, short, feature or documentary. It puts in one place for the first time details of over 1,000 funds and tax schemes in some 50 countries, alongside exhaustive and easy to understand explanations of all aspects of indie film financing, from microbudget shorts and docs to multi-million international co-productions. Over 40 experts from six continents have contributed to this exhaustive 480 page how-to and reference guide for filmmakers, producers, funders and advisers. The new edition features: • All forms of film finance explained in-depth, including new methods like crowdsourcing and web based micro-finance. • In depth international incentives (tax breaks and public money) covered for 50 countries (and dozens of states and regions), including the new UK, US federal and German tax incentives, written in collaboration with the legal experts in each country in language accessible for non lawyers. • Details of 1000 funding awards from over 300 bodies. • The internet as film studio; how to use the web for fund-raising, marketing and distribution. • Cutting budgets, a guide to microbudget and digital techniques. • Dozens of new case studies and interviews, including Oscar-winning producer Jeremy Thomas (The Last Emperor), Jim Gilliam (Brave New Films) - who raised $300,000 via the web, Susan Buice and Arin Crumley, whose produced YouTube's first feature stream, Roy Disney, Gus van Sant, Nik Powell ...

22
Feb

Adi Cohen’s- New York-based venture capitalist-  plans to invest in Spanish production company Zip Films through his company GC Corporation and new outfit Regal Entertainment encountered problems out of financial disputes. American Israeli businessman Adi Cohen established the pan-European media company Regal Entertainment in November last year with the purpose of investing in the production, distribution and exhibition of Spanish and German language films. Despite Regal’s early claims about major stake acquiring intentions Zip Films now claims that no money ever materialized for either deal. “We had signed an agreement with the GC Corporation for them to take a 25% stake in our company at a price of $4.6m (€3.7m), with a guarantee of $22.4m (€18m) over five years to invest in three films a year, but we never saw a penny,” Zip Films producer and founder Jordi Rediu tells ScreenDaily.  “Then again we saw no money with the proposed 75% stake in our company from Regal.” Cohen tells ScreenDaily in response: “After a prolonged period of due diligence and financial probe, we have decided to annul all agreements and discontinue our involvement with Zip Films due to financial irregularities. In accordance with the terms of the letter of intent we have fulfilled our initial responsibilities and obligations but opted to discontinue the partnership and sever all connections with Zip Films and its registered managers.” A venture capitalist with a background in high-risk, security high-tech stocks, Cohen serves as Regal’s chairman and administers its financial ...

22
Feb

Film investment increase of Channel 4

Channel 4 has said it will increase the budget of its film-financing division, Film4, to £15m per annum for five years from 2011 The anouncement came on the first day of the London Film Festival Channel 4’s commitment follows the public outcry over the Government’s decision to abolish the UK Film Council, without any consultation, as part of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport's contribution to the public sector efficiency drive. The new budget, effective from 2011 onwards, represents a 50% increase on Film4’s current spend on film development and financing, and a spokesman said it was central to the "creative renewal process" launched by Channel 4 earlier this year. David Abraham, chief executive of Channel 4, said: "Film4 has played a central role in supporting the British film industry and the current team, led by Tessa Ross, has an unrivalled track record of success in developing and supporting British film making." The London Film Festival’s opening gala film ‘Never Let Me Go’, starring Keira Knightley and directed by Mark Romanek, and the closing gala film, Danny Boyle’s ‘127 Hours’, are both Film4 films. Abraham said: "Film has a special and unique role in UK culture, promoting a wealth of extraordinary British talent from storytellers and producers, to directors and actors. I have been determined during the current process of creative renewal to ensure that it plays a commensurate part in Channel 4’s public service delivery." In its 10 years of existence, the Film ...

23
Oct

How To Finance a Hollywood Films?

Is sounds paradoxical and absurd but it's cheaper for a Hollywood studio to make a big-budget action movie than to make a shoestring art film like Sideways. Paramount’s experience displays this. In 2001 they used the German tax-shelter gambit. Loopholes in Germany's tax code are responsible for a good portion of Paramount's profits—an estimated $70 million to $90 million in 2003 alone. Best of all, there's no risk or cost for the studio (other than legal fees). In 1997, James Surowiecki explained why movie studios are a "lousy investment." David Edelstein says that Angelina Jolie is "the best special effect" in Lara Croft: Tomb Raider Here's how it works: Germany allows investors in German-owned film ventures to take an immediate tax deduction on their film investments, even if the film they're investing in has not yet gone into production. If a German wants to defer a tax bill to a more convenient time, a good way to do it is by investing in a future movie. The beauty of the German laws as far as Hollywood is concerned is that, unlike the tax laws in other countries, they don't require that films be shot locally or employ local personnel. German law simply requires that the film be produced by a German company that owns its copyright and shares in its future profits. This requisite presents no obstacle for studio lawyers. Advertisement The Hollywood studio starts by arranging on paper to sell the film's copyright ...

15
Aug

Film Capital

"Investors seeking riches in Hollywood are finding out why the movie capital is called Tinsel Town - all that glitters is not gold." "After pouring $15 billion into recent film deals, some investors have taken losses and many are demanding that film studios change how they structure the projects. Roiling credit markets have scared many away from untraditional investments, while some investors say studios treated them shabbily." "In recent years, hedge funds flush with cash were drawn to Hollywood deals amid projected double-digit returns. But both Hollywood and banking executives say several of    the deals over the past few years wound up costing investors hundreds of millions of dollars in losses." "The funds, partnered with big investment banks, often backed studios in transactions known as movie slate financing deals, taking on some risks formerly absorbed by studios in return for a share of profits from films in the slate." Source

05
Aug

Film Capital

"The emergence of the hedge fund, a form of Investment Company that enjoys wide latitude as to where it can place its money, has created millions of dollars in capital that is now being made available to the entertainment industry. Experts also note that the recent slowdowns of real estate and the stock market in delivering solid returns on investment have helped shift Wall Street's focus to Hollywood." "The pie is bigger in general," Tull says. "You have the growth of the international marketplace, (and) you have home video and markets that were not available years ago."  "Previously, you had this maverick, mogul-led Hollywood, where if you were an outsider who came in with bags of money, you left without them," Tull says. "Now, the studios are run by conglomerates, and the reporting structure is much more transparent."  "Also helping matters is the fact that studios are offering investors an opportunity to back their biggest titles."  "You have a very sophisticated Wall Street that does a lot of analysis," Osher says. "They have taken a look at the past performance of films over a number of years and made a determination that if they invest in a large-enough sample of pictures, they will make the return they are looking for."  "Studios are not necessarily thrilled about their new business partners, but with other funding sources drying up and parent companies tightening their purse strings, they must turn somewhere for cash." "Studios are doing this because ...